RealTime archive

When I was developing as an artist in Melbourne the one magazine that seemed to matter in the world of art, dance, theatre, media art and performance was RealTime. It came out monthly and would be dumped in large piles at different art institutions. RealTime gave me a sense of the art that was happening in all of Australia (and beyond), what was possible, and also what I wanted to avoid.

Recently, RealTime released their entire print archive as searchable PDFs:

Hot off the press!! At long last RealTime print editions 1-40 are available in our online archive. PDFs of each edition preserve the look of RealTime and each is searchable — treasure chests of highly responsive reviewing, critical thinking and, yes, humour (we even had ‘sports’ columns in those days).

https://mailchi.mp/realtimearts/print-issues-1-40-now-available-online-and-the-first-of-our-series-of-retrospective-long-reads-on-australian-art-and-performance-in-the-1990s?e=224354627b

The archive is here – http://www.realtime.org.au/archive/ – and if you have any interest in the way art and performance in Australia has shaped and been shaped by culture, then it’s a perfect collection of materials and ideas for you.

 

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resolutions

I stumbled across this photo the other day. It was an attempt to help students understand video aspect ratios and resolutions. Talk about a helpful guide.

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internet rules and a bit of gdpr

People who are familiar with this blog will know that I occasionally veer off into thoughts and links to do with privacy and security. The other day I was listening to an episode of a podcast called Firewalls Don’t Stop Dragons. The episode was about Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR. The host, Carey Parker, was interviewing an American lawyer Ruth Carter, who has been spending a lot of time looking into GDPR, and its ramifications for people and businesses in the US.

The episode is fascinating, and it’s clear that I need to do some cleaning up of various online materials as a consequence of GDPR. You can listen to it here if you are interested in GDPR:

americaoutloud.com/gdpr-here-i-come-ready-or-not

At the end Carter gives a little bit of advice about putting anything online. Her rules are:

  • imagine that it is appearing on the front page of a newspaper
  • imagine that it will be read by your best friend, your worst friend, your mother, and your boss.

I have no idea why people’s mothers – rather than our fathers – should be some kind of limtus test of whether to post something online or not. I imagine it has something to do with mothers being more sensitive than fathers, or some other lame-arse gender thing. Nevertheless, I like the principles of her thinking; a means to ground and help us (and particularly younger people) think through participation online.

microflicks

Back in 2006, David Corbet and I were working closely on a bunch of different projects. Often this including working with video in various ways. We got interested in pruning moving images down to the cellular (frame) level; that is, editing frames of movement to attempt to generate flickers of screendance. micro50s were born – the 50 referring to how many frames in 2 seconds of PAL video – and we called the project microflicks.

I finally got round to putting an archive of the micro50s up at skellis.info. The cover page (with details about the project) is at www.skellis.info/choreography#/microflicks, and the micro50s themselves are at www.skellis.info/micro50.

 

to avoid having to communicate and Jana Perković

The fantastic Jana Perković wrote/tweeted this sometime ago:

If you listen carefully, you will notice that Australians primarily use language not for communication, but to avoid having to communicate. The Australian English, spoken and written, relies heavily on formulas and linguistic presets (“How’s it going?”, “Oh, not too bad. You?”) for much longer into any given conversation and into any given relationship than in other languages I know.

I have a sneaky suspicion that New Zealand English is pretty similar. It seems like much of my adult life has been looking for ways to fight such resistance to entering communication.

Jana Perković (she used to be on twitter as @relatively) is such an arresting writer and thinker (among other things). See this post on the theatre scene in Melbourne as she calls a hiatus from her own website and to a certain extent social media:

http://guerrillasemiotics.com/2017/06/on-hiatus

And here’s a link to Jana’s podcast series called Audio Stage:

http://guerrillasemiotics.com/category/format/podcast/

There are rich pickings in there.

And, finally, here she is on Matt Cornell’s Wombat Radio podcast:

Part 1: http://wombatradio.com.au/jana-perkovic-part-1/
Part 2: http://wombatradio.com.au/jana-perkovic-part-2/

Jana – if you are reading this –I’m a fan, and hello from Italy.